Programmed in partnership with the V&A South Kensington, Invisible Worlds, was the first in a series of three artist talks exploring light and matter; Liliane Lijn, Susan Collins and UnitedVisualArtists. Bringing together these leading practitioners using technology and light in new and dynamic ways, the talks aimed to introduce the ideas and methodology behind each presenter’s work.

Shortlisted for the Fourth Plinth commission, Liliane Lijn works in a broad range of materials and media, making extensive use of new technologies to create works that view the world as energy. A constant dialogue between opposites, her sculptures use light and motion to transform themselves from solid to void, opaque to transparent, formal to organic. Her practice takes inspiration from science, oriental and western philosophies and the archetypal images of mythology. She is particularly interested in the interaction between light and matter.

 

Lijn describes her work as ‘A constant dialogue between opposites, my sculptures use light and motion to transform themselves from solid to void, opaque to transparent, formal to organic.’

         

Liliane Lijn, Stardust Ruins, 2008 from Keith Whittle on Vimeo.

Liliane Lijn was born in New York in 1939, educated in Europe and has lived in London since 1966. She is a leading pioneer and exponent of kinetic art who in her work has experimented with light, movement, words, film, liquids and industrial materials. She had a retrospective exhibition in 2005 at the Mead Gallery, University of Warwick Arts Centre and a solo show at England & Co in 2006, Liliane Lijn: Selected Works 1959-1980. Lijn is currently working on her Solar Hills project: large-scale solar installations in the landscape, the outcome of her residency at the Space Sciences Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. In November 2008, Lijn was one of the five artists featured in the BBC1 program Let There Be Light in the Imagine series presented by Alan Yentob. Recent highlights include exhibitions at Riflemaker Gallery, 2008 the ICA, London, and Poem Game, as part of the Serpentine Poetry Marathon curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist.

Programme curated by Keith Whittle. Special thanks to Irini Mirena Papadimitriou and staff at V&A.